Monitoring of catechin content by high performance liquid chromatography during the development of seed and pods of Saraca asoca (Roxb.) De Willd

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Research Articles | Published:

Print ISSN : 0970-4078.
Online ISSN : 2229-4473.
Website:www.vegetosindia.org
Pub Email: contact@vegetosindia.org
Doi: 10.1007/s42535-023-00600-w
First Page: 341
Last Page: 354
Views: 1390


Keywords: n Saracan asocan , Catechin, HPLC, TLC-fingerprint, DPPH-TLC


Abstract


Saraca asoca (Roxb.) Willd, is an indigenous medicinal plant of family Caesalpiniaceae. Different parts of this plant including seeds and pods, possess numerous biological activities on account of the presence of various phytoconstituents. Phenolic compounds, especially catechin, is the critical constituent responsible for the many pharmacological activity of Saraca asoca. The level of phytoconstituent in plant part depends upon the harvesting time. The bio-active contents changes during the development process of plant parts and is affected by many factors. Hence, the present study aims to find the best harvest time for pods and seeds by monitoring the changes in morphological, organoleptic and microscopic characters, followed by physiochemical analysis and chromatographic studies during development process. The chromatographic techniques like thin layer chromatography (TLC) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were used to develop the fingerprint profile and determination of catechin content, respectively. The catechin content was also determined in stem bark to find any chance of substitution with seed and pod. The antioxidant potential was also determined by DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl)-TLC method. It was found that seed (SD-4) and pod (PD-1) contained the maximum catechin content. This study provides the basis for collecting seed and pod at the best harvesting time. Also, the comparative studies for catechin content between stem bark, seed and pods suggest the use of seed and pods in place of stem bark but only at the proper age, as the excessive usage of stem bark may decrease the plants life expectancy by damaging the plant system.


n              Saracan              asocan            , Catechin, HPLC, TLC-fingerprint, DPPH-TLC


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Acknowledgements


The authors are thankful to the Director General, CCRAS, New Delhi, India, for providing all the necessary facilities.


Author Information


Dahiya Jyoti
Department of Pharmacognosy, Central Ayurveda Research Institute, CCRAS, Ministry of AYUSH, Kolkata, India
jyotidahiya31@gmail.com
Kumar Deepak
Department of Chemistry, Central Ayurveda Research Institute, CCRAS, Ministry of AYUSH, Kolkata, India
dpkjangid89@gmail.com

Bolleddu Rajesh
Department of Pharmacognosy, Central Ayurveda Research Institute, CCRAS, Ministry of AYUSH, Kolkata, India

rajesh_bolleddu@rediffmail.com
Dutta Sreya
Department of Pharmacognosy, Central Ayurveda Research Institute, CCRAS, Ministry of AYUSH, Kolkata, India

mailtosreya.27@gmail.com
Mall Simmi
Department of Pharmacognosy, Central Ayurveda Research Institute, CCRAS, Ministry of AYUSH, Kolkata, India
simmimall2022@gmail.com
Hazra Kalyan
Department of Chemistry, Central Ayurveda Research Institute, CCRAS, Ministry of AYUSH, Kolkata, India
kalyan987@gmail.com
Mangal Anupam K.
Department of Pharmacognosy, Central Ayurveda Research Institute, CCRAS, Ministry of AYUSH, Kolkata, India
anupam.mangal68@gmail.com